Information about your rifle.

Frequently asked questions

How do I sight in my Clamp On or Drill & Tap Scope Mount?


The offset of the mount is a nominal 11/16", so make your Point of Aim at center of a 1" paster for the Clamp On Mount. The point of Impact will be on the right edge of the 1" paster and it will remain so out to 1,000 yards. No need to zero the POI on the bullseye. If you can tell the difference beyond 200 yards, you're a much better shot than I am, Gunga Dihn. LOL Whatever scope you choose, remember that the lower and closer to the axis of the bore, the better.




How do I align my 1911 Clamp On Scope Mount for scopes and the P11 Diopter?


Mount your scope solidly on the rail. Move the windage knob all the way left, then count the turns it takes to move it all the way right.
Return it left exactly one half of the full travel, that will be to dead center for the scope.
Follow the enclosed card pictorial directions. Turn the rear screw in till it just stops. Do not tighten!
Remove the bolt on your rifle. Set a target at the 25 or 50 yard mark.
Now, with your rifle in a rest or sandbagged, look down the bore and center it on the bullseye.
Move your head up to the scope and move the front of the mount until the crosshairs are on the bullseye. Tignten the front screw and check for crosshair position while tightening. Do not tighten all the way.
Now tighten the rear bolt down. Check the scope again and tighten the front bolt.
Now tighten both bolts down dead tight. You should be at dead center windage.




K31 and 1911 Offset mount illustration


The attached rendering is the sight picture setup virtually all of us here at SP use for Swiss Rifles as well as for the M1D Garand Sniper.

The offset of the mount is 11/16", so leave it at exactly that POI at 100 yards and it will remain so out to 1,000 yards. No need to zero it on the bullseye. If you do, the POI will change the further out your target is.

If you can tell the difference beyond 200 yards, you're a much better shot than I am, Gunga Dihn.
I also use a fixed IOR Valdada 10 power on my zfk55, but that's an entirely different animal. Whichever scope you choose, remember that the lower and closer to the axis of the bore, the better.
In our experience, it's not usual for brass to hit your scope upon ejection, but if brass is touching your scope, then go to the hardware store and buy a small roll of the product 3M VHB. Make sure it's in black and about 1/2 inch wide. It's a double sided adhesive that's about 1/64 inch thick so it does provide a cushion. Wipe the lower quadrant closest to the receiver with alcohol, let it dry and then wipe again with a soft, clean cloth. Cut off two or 3 inches of the tape and apply it right to that area where you think the brass is touching. Rub a small amount of any kind of oil onto the surface of the tape and that will contaminate and deactivate the adhesive on the exposed side.
That will be the end of your problems.




Waffen Fett and Automatterfett (Greases)


The grease is used for three purposes being cleaning, lubricating and protecting and the last can be divided in normal use and storage.

To start with the cleaning first, before shooting the Swiss run a pad through the bore to clean out the grease there and from the bolt face, they do that with the help of a grease rod, that ones comes with a jag for a pad and a black grease brush.
Immediately after shooting they run that black brush with Automatenfett through the still hot bore, put some grease on the bolt face and leave it like that. After they get home they clean it all from the grease, get a bore rope or cleaning brush through the bore and after that they lube it all again with fresh grease that stays on till the next shooting match.
The grease dissolves the fouling and makes cleaning way more easy as using oil.

Lubricating during normal use is only done on few spots, the most important ones are the flat (or round with the older straight pulls) inside receiver sliding part of the operating rod and the tip of the operating rod where it enters the bolt sleeve groove, that area needs to be lubed well.
There should be no grease inside the bolt or at the outside but it won't hurt to use a tiny bit in the locking nut area.
Do not use too much grease, the manual reads for the K31 "battle lubricating"......NONE , so the above is only to make your rifle operate more smoothly with less wear, after all the shooting range is no battle field.

The protecting part is easy, Automatenfett can be used on bare metal to protect it against corrosion, use it limited especially on moving parts as we don't want sand to stick to these.

For storage, the -"Parkdienstschmierung" as they say there- it's easy also;
Barrel inside and outside, greased
Chamber, greased
Trigger assembly, inside bolt and hammer piece, NO grease (still the arsenals did not follow that rule that well as examples show)
Bare metal parts, greased
Blued parts, greased

The storage part is the reason why so many new owners of K31's in the USA think that they are in Cosmoline which is not the case, when they have been in storage in Swiss arsenals for a long time they are still well protected by the old yellow Waffenfett, the more recent ones are well protected by black Automatenfett.

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So your rifle came to you in the usual condition of the k31. Stock a bit beat up but with most of the metal finish intact and sharp, shiney lands and grooves, and you intend to keep it that way.
Stop and think about this. The rifle came to you in the condition in which the Swiss soldier and Armoury kept it for many years. Is it not then a reasonable assumption that you'd follow the same maintenance ritual that has kept it in that condition for so many years? Maybe, but the average American shooter believes strongly in all of the advertising hype and testimonials to a myriad of maintenance products deemed absolutely necessary to keep a rifle as pristine as possible, few of which are factually relevant to the k31 barrel.

This was written by my Dad quite a few years ago.

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The Armoury and the well instructed Swiss soldier used a product called Waffenfett, or weapon grease. A close and reasonable approximation in the US is Lubriplate 930 cut with 15% Moly Paste.
The barrel is swabbed with 930, running a patch back and forth followed by a dry patch. At the end of the shooting session while the barrel is still hot or warm, the lubriplate is worked back into the barrel and left that way until the next shooting session when a dry patch is run back through removing the excess lubriplate. That's it. If carbon in the throat and chamber become an issue from firing reloads, use a good carbon remover such as Montana Extreme, but leave the bore alone. It is a fact that excessive bore cleaning with brushes can and will shorten your barrel life.

If, by shooting reloaded cartridges utilizing copper jacketed projectiles, your bore shows copper fouling, use a product such as WipeOut to remove it. This kind of a product fulfills it's task without continual scrubbing of the bore.

This may sound like an overly simple approach, and the typical US shooter is usually a ready recipient of industry marketing efforts and barrel maintenance, but use this logic. My 50+ year old rifle came to me with a truly amazing bore. Why would I not then follow the maintenance practices of the Armoury and Soldier that delivered it to me in this condition?




What do I need for Reloading the 7.5x55 Cartridge?


A press, Forster (recommended) RCBS Rock Chucker or Dillon 550B
(If its RCBS get the Primer Option)

Dies for your caliber (RCBS, Redding, Hornady etc.)
Spray lubricant and case neck brush, or
Castor Oil (recommended) See "Reloading" FAQ

Wooden or plastic case block to hold 50 cases
Powder Dispenser (RCBS)
Powder scale
Case mouth Funnel
Powder Trickler
Manual Case Trimmer with collet for your caliber. Wilson (recommended)
or RCBS.

Reamer/Champfer for case mouths
Calipers to measure case lengths
Powder and Primers.
Sierra Reloading Manual (recommended)

If you shoot very much you really do need a Case Tumbler.
Dillon or Lyman are the best.
Case tumbler medium, walnut preferred.




What is the process for reloading 7.5x55 cartridge?


A group is not three rounds. I consider a great 3 round group as " a fortuitous group."
A group is a 5 round minimum.
When we consider a particular set of load data as "proven", it means a 10 target minimum (typically 20 for us) with absolutely "repeatable" 5 round POI groups per target. That data is then assigned to that rifle by serial number in a small log book that each rifle here has. If that data works well with another 4 or 5 rifles, then it's logged into our main Data Book for k31s.
My "data" on the SRDC site is a fraction of a highly condensed series of many thousands of rounds of data testing over a 35 years +/- period of time. All that means is that the data presented worked as written for a small group of load testing rifles. Those rifles were selected long ago for their consistent, proven performance. ALL of the data was collected from rifles fired from a fixed "Accurite" firing device. Only the trigger finger touched the rifle at all, so the human equation was removed altogether. My "platform" is the basis upon which all of my load data begins, and it's NOT that hard. You can analyze, illustrate, debate and tweak till the cows come home but it all ends with one single base. Your case preparation.

My credentials? 45 years of reloading and 32 of those devoted to the 7.5 Swiss cartridge. Load data of mine that was in use long before the manuals figured out that their own data was erroneous and based on the wrong rifle. Do I have any magic? Absolutely not. Is there anything mysterious or technically difficult to understand about how I do it? Absolutely not. Have I varied one iota from my original "platform" in case preparation? Absolutely not.... and yet I see a supposed mystique surrounding the reloading for this cartridge evoking all kinds of semi confusing answers that are completely unnecessary.

I won't argue with anyone about presses or dies. This is what works for me, take it or leave it. Want to use a different press or die set? Go for it. After all these years and many thousands of successful rounds downrange, I'm not changing anything, however, advances in technology may now dictate other wise to you.

A) Whatever kind of press you have, using Redding Comp, RCBS dies or your own choice, run the ram all the way up. Turn your sizing/decapping die all the way down against the shellholder. Lower the ram and turn the die down another 1/2 turn or so, maybe even less, but make sure that when you run the ram back up the ram "cams over" at the top of the stroke. This is "full length sizing". I don't want to hear about all of the variables in die setting possibilities with all of the other cartridges you use. For the 7.5 Swiss, make your press cam-over at the top of the stroke to begin. Find a better way for youself later? Why not.
Neck sizing? Forget it. After very few times fired in a k31 your case won't be chambering anyway. Even if you do neck size, your case will have to be hand-fed into the chamber and indexed to exactly the same "o'clock" position every time to be effective. Not all k31 chambers are identical. I do it with a few of my commercial rifles with some success. 7.5 Swiss? Forget it. Its an exercise in futility that won't shade my loads anyway, and there are many local k31 owners that are now believers.
I've used a myriad of presses, both fixed and progressive over the years and the RCBS Rockchucker was my mainstay for load data development until the Dillon 550B came along. We now use a Forster almost exclusively for precision reloading.
Though I have a spread of other mfg's dies, Redding comp is all I use for the 7.5 Swiss. I currently have 6 sets of RCBS as well.

B) Set your decapper to the proper depth allowing just a bit of the tip to appear through the bottom of the shellholder. Screw it in too deeply and you'll bend the shaft and ruin a case. Lock the die into place.

1) Use a case tumbler or a washing machine to get your brass clean. If its a washing machine, put all the brass in a pillowcase, tie the top and wash them in hot water with a good dishwashing soap. Shake all the water out and let them dry overnight on a towel.

2) TTL.... Trim To Length. Our spec will be 2.179 or less. I suggest you don't trim much shorter than 2.160.
Ream and champfer the case mouths. If you don't have that little tool, buy one.

3) Lubing: Use a case lube/pad combo or the new sprays which I consider superior. Plain old Castor Oil works great too (Now preferred). If its a pad, use your fingers to spread the lube evenly over the surface of the pad and roll the cases completely. Use your finger and tip the case mouth down and roll that too. Don't get lube on the shoulders. This type of lube is non-compressible and can dent your case shoulders upon sizing. Use a mouth brush to get inside, but use it sparingly.
Spray: Using a cookie sheet, line it with aluminum foil and lay your cases down on their sides with all the mouths facing toward you. Holding the can at a 45 degree angle, spray from the rear of the cases toward the mouth allowing spray to enter the case mouths. Using the flat of your hand, roll the cases around and hit the case mouths once more very lightly. If it's to be Castor Oil, use it sparingly. It goes a long way.
Spray lube and Castor Oil are not of the non-compressible variety so you won't have a problem with the case shoulders as long as you don't overdo it..

4) Lightly coat the inside of your die with spray lube. Do NOT do this with paste lube. Put a case in the shell holder and run it up firmly but gently. If you feel any resistance, STOP! Lower the ram and check the depth of your decapper. Check to make sure the inside your die was actually polished at the factory. This is not at all unheard of. I've gotten 3 of these over the years and they will not allow you to run the case in.

Assuming your ram cammed-over at the top of the stroke, you should now have a properly sized case that will chamber without any resistance in your chamber.
Have to hit your bolthandle with the palm of your hand to get it to chamber? Projectile seating aside, it won't be because you didn't size your case correctly.
I've read plenty of rationale on chambering, and (without telling you how many Swiss rifles I have) None of mine chamber other than smoothly and easily, without rapping.

5) Clean your primer pockets with the appropriate tool. I use the small, formed wire brush in a plastic handle meant for this procedure. Seat your primers dead flush with the case base.

6) Projectile seating: It is not at all necessary to crimp for the 7.5 Swiss rifles. Crimping introduces a variable that you don't need. The grip of the case mouth on the bullet will not be identical every single time, thus, the unwanted variable.
To determine proper seat depth for any given projectile, keep in mind that the measurement is only valid when the contact of the bullet's ogive and the lands/grooves is determined.
Your manual says OAL is 3.020?... maybe for that bullet that they used, but only for that bullet profile, not all others. Projectile profiles vary from mfg to mfg. So how do you do it?

There are any number of ways, but I've always used the same methodology. Take a sized, empty and unprimed, uncharged case, start a bullet into the case mouth leaving it protruding further than is apparently correct. Place it in the rifle's chamber by hand, ease the bolt into full battery and "smartly" eject it. Measure that OAL and seat it 2 to 4 thousandths deeper. This is a good start. Later, when you've become more deeply involved in data gathering, you may want to play with seat depths to find the sweet spot for your cartridge. I have specifics I use regularly. Bear in mind that the k31 has a short throat, and the k31 typically prefers the ogive very close to the lands.

Yes, there are other ways. If you like your way better .......use it.
Once you determine your chambered OAL for that bullet, screw your seating die down until the mouth of an empty case stops the descent and back it out a full turn. Lock the die in place and back out the seater.

That method is only going to work for one bullet profile, and it its a hollow point its not going to be accurate anway since not all meplats are the same even in the same box. Your bullet seater should be indexed behind the tip ahead of the ogive, not on the tip of the bullet. A Sierra 175 MK is not going to be the same as a Berger 175 VLD at all. Both should index on an area ahead of the ogive, but not all ogives are the same distance from either the case mouth or the bullet tip. If you use just the tip you're going to have two completely different freebores for the same caliber, weight and charge with likely two different results.

Now measure it and decide how far off the lands you want to begin. Note that figure and begin working out your load, adjusting seat depth as you go. But remember that was only for that bullet profile. Change profiles and you're back to square one.

Find load data that might be in a trusted manual or proven data from the board. Always begin with a lesser load even if the data you find "appears" to be proven.

"Stand up and shoot it like a man!"
Only if Jeff Cooper is watching, otherwise use a bench rest when developing your load data. Use the same rest or bagging methodology every time you shoot. Remove all variables from your data gathering..... and that's the secret, gents. Consistency. Consistency.

Ok, the final step I consider important if you're striving to squeeze every ounce of accuracy out of your Swiss rifles is.............. www.swissrifles.com/sr/pierre/accurizing.html

Does it work? You'd have to ask those who have used the methodology, and there are a lot of them now. I have read a few comments about how it "didn't work for me. A waste of time". It probably was, for those folks. They didn't follow the process correctly and most likely were shooting unproven loads with improperly sized cases or stocks with an unnoticed, inherent problem. All of my rifles are accurized, and every one of them improved forthwith.

To wrap this up, I advise that you remove every single variable that you can think of. When reloading, never vary from your case prep (hopefully successful) formula. When shooting for load data, never vary from your shooting stance/position. Record results from every single target you print. Be careful and I wish you success.

P

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There are a lot of ways to get to the same positive end result. This is one that worked for for me with Swiss Rifles. If you find better ways, use them, but be careful. Use manufacturers books and read the cautions and limits.
I should add that we now use Redding Competition bushing dies for almost everything including 7.5 Swiss. See other Reloading Notes here in the FAQ,




How do I sight in a Diopter?



Sight in:
1) Get into shooting position with unloaded rifle. Everything you will need to shoot should be within arms reach.
Do not get up or move your elbows too much.
2) Find the best place for your cheek on the stock. You should be fairly close to the safety ring. I use my thumb
as a spacer between the ring and my nose to get the same cheek position time after time. I of course lower my
thumb before firing.
3) Center the front sight hood in rear sight. Should have equal amount of space all around the outside of the front side hood
4) Aim at target, center it in the middle of your front sight ring or on top of the front sight post with a slight gap
between the top of the post and the bottom of the target.
5) You should always be focusing on the front sight, not the target.
6) Dry fire a couple times.
7) Move to the third smallest hole available on the rear diopter sight.
8 ) See how sharp the front post or aperture is.
9) Compare the sharpness of the front sight using smaller and larger rear diopter hole sizes. Look for the clearest
possible setting for the light conditions you have that day.
10) Now you can load the rifle! I just saved you a lot of money in ammo.
11) Keep a sheet of paper and a pencil handy. Keep track of every shot.
12) First shot is a fouler. Write:"1- F", and its clock position.
13) Fire three more shots and write down their clock positions.
14) Estimate where the center of shots 2, 3 and 4 is and correct accordingly. Remember each click is MOA.
15) Repeat from 13 until youre sighted in.

Notes: All of the following are more noticeable as the shooting distance increases.
1) Expect your point of impact to change during the course of the day as the sun changes it position relative to the target.
2) If you change aperture size after sight-in, you most likely will have re-sight it again.
3) Changes in cheek position WILL affect your sighting.
4) Changes in body positions WILL affect you sighting.
5) Do not mix ammo, I always try to use the same lot of ammo in a session, even with GP11.




What loads are safe for my reciever?


I've been working with Swiss rifles since the late 50s. I've been developing load data since 1963 as the manuals then extant were erroneous in their representaion of both pressures and strength of the receivers. For whatever reason, the manual publishers were basing all of their load data on the Schmidt Rubin model 1889. The GP11 cartridge was the issue cartridge for the Schmidt Rubin beginning with the 1911sr. This is the same cartridge issued today for the PE57 autoloader and the predecessors, 1911, k11, k31 and the Sniper zfk3155.

Does it not then stand to reason that the 1911 and k31, being designed to fire the same cartridge as the PE57, would have receivers of a strength equal to the modern autoloader? Would it surprise you to know that the factory in Bern offered the k31 in 7.5 Swiss, .308, 30/06 and 300 Winchester Magnum? It still is. You can buy one today from the Hammerli facility. But I digress.

Early reloading manuals assumed that the bolts on the 1911s, k11s and k31s were identical to the 1889. Not so at all. The 1889 could NOT stand the pressures developed by the GP11 and therefore the publishers relegated all data and warnings to all of the Schmidt Rubins! Gross error! I dioscoverd this error very early on, called Bern, spoke to an armourer, explained my theory, he agreed and I began a lifelong search for the commercial accuracy loads for the SRs. BTW......... I found it. In fact a number of them.

The locking lugs on the earlier SRs were at the back of the bolt itself. This meant that the case head of the cartridge was largely unsupported, but with the advent of the 1911 the lugs were moved midway up the bolt proper and provided more than enough support for the case head. The 1911 receiver was also substantially stroner than the 1889, in fact strong enough to allow importers in the late 70s/early 80s to convert a large number of imported 1911s to .308. CUP for the 7.5 is around 42,000. The .308 is 50,000+, so that should also tell you that the 1911 receiver/bolt combo is plenty strong.

The k31 amd the zfk3155 have the strongest of the bolt/receiver combinations. The locking lugs were moved forward right to the head of the bolt. The 30-06 and 300 winmag are no problem for this rifle. Enough preface.

The dies.
I was asked to develop a forum for these rifles about 4 years ago (1999). I spent a tremendous amount of time educating new SR owners who had not a clue as to proper load data or accurizing. (I won't get into the accurizing thing at this point) Having been supplied with load data, a number of these folks began reloading the caliber. Wihin one month I had 3 incidents of "gas blow-by" from those usnig Lee 7.5 Swiss dies. The bolt of the SR provides a channel directly to the rear, allowing blow-by gasses to "kiss" the face of the shooter! Three more incidents followed with another 4 months. FAR too many for coincidence.

Lee makes an excellent die. I've also been told that the circumstances surrounding the SRs don't happen with all Lee 7.5 dies. I don't know. I also have never had an interest in testing these dies. There's no point. I do assume that there is an inherent problem with using the die for this caliber. I can tell you that my son is not allowed to use Lee dies for reloading his 7.5 Swiss brass. In the past 5 years not one single incident of blow-by has ever been reported to me on swissrifles.com involving RCBS 7.5, Redding Comp or Hornady dies. There are others that work well too. Take your pick.
I can't tell you how many thousands of rounds in that caliber I've reloaded in 55 years or so, but its a bunch. Never one single failure involving the die has ocurred.

I'm loathe to retype the whole thing here as its quite long, but please do read the reloading for the 7.5 Swiss page before proceeding with reloading for your rifle. It will give you needed insight into the whys and wherefores.

Thank you..... Pierre St.Marie

*NOTE: Its been at least 4 years since I've heard about a Lee problem with this caliber. Maybe it's solved.




What Projectiles and Powders should I begin with? ....And RELODER17 info


Note: Swiss Products cannot be held responsible for the use of posted load data.
This data is applicable only to the rifles noted and tested. You're may vary, so always approach unknown load data with caution
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These are pages of load data that I've compiled over a lot of years. These represent many thousands of round downrange. These are the end results of the best performers over that time span using the "projectiles and powders of the day."

ALWAYS begin with the data in a manual and work your way up.
I will later add our latest successful projectile and powder combinations. I will also add the ICP (Impact Coated Projectile) processes we now use.

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Pierre's 7.5x55 Reloading Data
I don't feel comfortable "recommending" load data for rifles of which I have no personal knowledge, therefore, this is my disclaimer prior to
posting my own load data. Particularly if you are a reloading novice, this is important. Your k31 is not a new rifle. These powders/projectiles are! Not
knowing the particulars of your rifle, I can only say how these loads performed in MY OWN RIFLES! They may not perform the same in yours. I can say
that these loads performed slightly differently in each of the three k31s concerned. This would be because not all barrels are absolutely identical. You
MUST approach these loads with caution, approaching them in .5g increments. We all love these old SRs, but no one knows what stresses your action
may have sustained before you got it, therefore accept the fact that the loads I'll be posting worked for me. They may or may not work for you. You
experienced reloaders know exactly what all this means. Consider your own rifle and be safe! Regards

All rounds were fired from an "Accurite" shooting device that accepts the entire weapon, allows natural recoil and "contained muzzle jump". Micrometer
windage/elevation & "cant" adjustments are used. All shots were 5rd groups from 100yds. Consider temperatures were variable, which may have an
effect on your rifle's performance. No extremes, however.

Three k31s were used and categorized by their mfg date. Extensive reloading narrowed the projectiles down to two, which worked the best in THESE
three rifles. The 165g is a remington .30cal PSPCL. A jacketed soft nosed projectile with flat sidewalls and flat base. The second projectile is a 173g
U.S. Military issue "pulled" fmjspbt. I reiterate, the following loads performed well in THESE THREE RIFLES. You must approach these loads
responsibly based on YOUR knowledge of YOUR rifle.

All three k31s are pristine samples of their genera.

k31 #1 mfg'd 1937

165g
N203......40.5g.........1.69"
BLC2......39g...........1.75"
3031......36g...........1.8"
414.......43g...........1.56"
4064......37g...........1.0"
4831......47g...........1.13

173g
414.......43g...........1.10
4064......39.............97"
BLC2......40g............1.59
4350......38.5g..........1.76
3031......35.............1.97

k31#2 mfg date 1946

165g
3031......36.2g...........1.85"
4064......37g.............1.0"
414.......43.1g...........1.65"
4831......47g.............1.23"

173g
414.......43..............1.15"
BLC2......40g.............1.83"
4064......39..............0.91"
4350......38.1g...........1.94"
3031......35..............1.75

k31#3 mfg date 1955

165g
N203......40g..............1.98"
3031......36g..............1.87
BLC2......39.1g............1.40"
2520......39...............1.55"
4831......47g..............1.30"
414.......42...............1.57
4064......37g..............1.0"

173g
4350......38...............1.99"
3031......35g..............1.85
4064......39g..............0.88"
BLC2......40g..............1.65"
414.......43g..............1.10"

FURTHER TESTING

All rounds fired from an Accurite Rest, all groups consist of two five rd groups.
Brass, Norma, Projectile- 165g Remington SPLSC & 173g fmjbt, "pulled". Primers, CCI-LR. Brass TTL & champfered inside/outside.

165g
4831SC........45g........1.65"
IMR3031.......35g........1.30"
IMR3031.......36g......... .70"

173g fmjbt
4831SC........48g......... .88"
IMR3031.......34g......... .90" in a perfect vertical string.
IMR3031.......35g......... .44" & 1 flyer .82" out
(second group 3031)....... .71 & 1 flyer .75" out
All BLC2 loads exceeded 2"



The above loads were the result of EXTREME CARE of each barrel after each group.( brass cleaning etc) Your rifle may or may not show similar taste
for these loads, and there are certainly a myriad of other loads that may prove better performers in YOUR rifle. Reload Safely! And good luck!!

I never recommend bullet depth seating as it varies slightly from rifle to rifle, (and a projectile jammed tight against the lands/grooves CAN make differences in chamber pressures, although usually not dangerously. This will definitely affect projectile performance.) Partially seat a projectile in an EMPTY UNPRIMED cartridge and ease the bolt forward to full lock. Eject the whole works, measure it with a micrometer and back it off another .019 to .021 or whatever your particular reloading book recommends. The "lyman casting handbook" is a good source of odd reloading info! No, I did not i/o true the case mouths. I developed these loads based on the recommended TTL and used materials & methods allowing me to shoot often without hours of technical fooling around with components. One thing I should have included is the primers were CCI. Sometimes you hear that magnum primers work better with some powders that have burn rates that somehow don't perform as well as you'd expect. This happens to be true, but you need to do those experiments with care. Be careful.

Pierre

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7.5x55 Load Data
by
Pierre St. Marie

All load data printed herein should be approached with extreme caution. The rifles concerned, despite being very strong, are 50 years old. This data has all performed very well in the 1911 and k31 Schmidt Rubins. All of them printed groups of less than 2" at 100yds, and the majority were 1.5" and 1" or less.
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Two loads that tested out exceptionally well are:

Berger VLD 168gr........47.4gr of IMR4320

Berger VLD 175gr........45.8gr of 4350

The last one consistently beat the GP11 for me at 300 to 500 yards. All three are winning loads, all things being equal.

"Equal" = ALL brass identical TTL.
ALL brass full length sized.
Seat depths on the VLDs are
exactly that of the GP11s @ 3.060
Sierra seat depth is 2.890
Seat depths are critical for consistency.

If you intend that these, or any loads, prove themselves, absolute consistency in every aspect of your loading procedures is mandatory.

Not one iota of variance.
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The following loads have all been found to be quite accurate.

Remington PSPCL 165gr:
N203...................40.5gr
BLC2..................39gr
3031....................36gr
414......................43gr
4064....................37gr
4831....................47gr
2520....................39gr

Military Ball 173gr "pulled":
414.......................43gr
4064.....................39gr
3031.....................35gr
4350.....................38.1gr
4064.....................39gr
BLC2...................40gr

Sierra Match king 168gr:
4064.....................43.9gr
4350.....................46.8gr
4064.....................37gr

Sierra Match king 175gr:
4064......................42gr
4350......................45.8gr

Sierra 165gr HP/BT:
4320......................44gr
4064......................43.5

Berger VLD168gr:
4895......................44gr

Nominal seat depths for the 1911:
3.060"

Nominal seat depths for the k31:
2.890"
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Addendum: Here are some recent additions to the list.

1. Bullet: Norma 146gr. FJPBT
Powder: Vit. N140 49grs.
Primer: CCI 200
Case: RWS

2. Bullet: Sierra 165gr. SBT (2145)
Powder: 4350 ACCU 51.6grs.
Primer: CCI 200
Case: Norma

3. Bullet: Hornady 168gr. BTHP (3050)
Powder: 47 grs. ROT R903
Primer: CCI BR2
Case: Norma

4. Bullet: Berger 168gr. HPBT/Moly
Powder: DuPont IMR-4320 47.4grs.
Primer: CCI 200
Case: RWS

5. Bullet: Lapua D-46 185 gr. (.308)
Powder: Vit. N160 50 grs.
Primer: Norma LR
Case: Norma

6. Bullet: Hornady 190gr BTHP(3080)
Powder: Vit. N160 51.5grs.
Primer: CCI 200
Case: Norma

7. Bullet: Hornady 190gr BTHP (3080)
Powder: ROT R907 46grs.
Primer: RWS 5341
Case: Norma
8. RELODER17 Bullet:175gr Berger Vld, Hornady 175 ELD or 175gr Sierre Match KIng Assuming you have followed all of the case preparation instructions, this beginning point for use of the 175 grain projectile and Reloder17 may put you exactly where you want to be for minute of angle shooting.
Begin at 49 grains of Reloder17 and work your way toward 50.1 grains in .02 grain increments..
__________________
Latigo and P




What is "Accurizing" my swiss rifle?


I am not at all concerned with the built in accurizing technique of pre-loading the stock. It is now my belief that this accurizing technique from the manufacturer leaves too many variables in the mix. Any flexing of the stock (being in direct, tight contact with the barrel) will change POI at range. If ALL users of the k31 & 1911 were to shoot their rifles with the identical technique, EVERY time, I may not have an argument concerning the armory shim/pre-loading methodology. But............none of us do shoot identically other than those in the shooting clubs, and, I suspect, even those good folks introduce physical variables of their own at times. So...............

I've invested quite a bit of time in arriving at a rather simple conclusion I had always known, from experience, to be true as will any odd directional, barely visible warping. "Do not interfere with the barrel". That simple. Of course, none of us want to remove that classic stock and fore grip from the k31s or the Schmidt Rubins, so I did the next best thing. I relieved all reasonable stress contact from the barrel.

I did this by designing a "spacer" meant to go between the flanges of both barrel bands. This simple spacer relieved the barrel of any meaningful contact with the stock. If the spacers are used correctly, the fore stock will feel "loose" at the barrel band. Of course, one could rout out the raceway to relieve the barrel, but I am loathe to remove any wood from the stock. Allowing the barrel to vibrate uninhibited definitely tightened up my groups. I had, of course, used a load capable of moa for these tests. This also meant that I could not use the sling in any kind of a bracing action. That would negate my efforts. Now for the second discovery. I found that "balancing" the tang screw against the receiver screw also had an effect on accuracy.
To determine spacer width requirements, loosen the screw on the front band until the band retainer will compress and release freely. The space you see between the flanges approximates the thickness required for the spacer. With the spacer(s) installed, the front to the stock should have a bit of "play", so that you can see/feel it move when you wiggle it. The rear band should also NOT grip the stock tightly. It, too should have a bit of play. This will leave the barrel relatively uninhibited by the stock. Also remember not to use the sling to "brace" the rifle. That tension will put pressure against the barrel too. Use the sling just to "steady" the rifle without undue pressure.

After installing the spacers, I begin by loosening both screws. I coat the rear screw with LocTite. I then tighten the receiver screw dead tight. I turn the tang screw down tight and back it our 3/4 of a turn or a little better. You'll need to have around 30 dependable loads ready for this test. Definitely do it from a bench rest, and if you have open sights, use a clearly defined target at no more than 75 yards.

Fire a group of 3 or 4 rounds. Tighten the tang screw in 1/8 turn increments, repeating the process and, using a new target for each run, note how the groups will spread or tighten to minor degrees. These differences will make themselves manifest at range. Once you find the "sweet spot" with the tang screw, allow it to sit while the LocTite cures.

This procedure will be all the more apparent with scoped rifles, but the Diopter and Willaims will also show clearly what a difference can be made. Emails from subscribers to this method have proven to me that this method definitely works. Why "fix something that ain't broke"?......... because mine have the capability to outperform the ones that "ain't broke". The rest is up to the shooter.

Something I forgot to add. The k31/55 barrel band does NOT compress the stock tightly against the barrel. At least mine dont. This, and the fact that the bipod is attached to the receiver, tells me that someone in the armory felt that the barrel should be uninhibited too.
And.......... Just so we have some reality into this.......... I've always said that there are many k31's that work very well with the preloaded stock, but the stock has to be an "as original issued" stable stock. Sometimes improper storage and simple age will cause a stock to apply pressure in the wrong direction, and those rifles are the main reason for our using spacers and screw balance to accurize our rifles. We never, ever remove wood. Another possible way is to change the lug shim, but once again, if the stock puts pressure left or right on the barrel, then that may not help much. When I said that every rifle in the armoury is set up with his accurizing technique, that doesn't mean that yours must be. It's just like reloading. There are many ways to get to a great end result, not just this way. It works for us based on the stock/barrel relationship of our individual rifles. Check your forestock. Is the blackened area only straight down on the bottom. or does is show an uneven area of dark wood to the left, right, off dead center or the upper foregrip? And don't forget that the flanges on the front ring must be tight and solid. The stock should not be flopping around when fired.
I strongly disagree with the notion that my method accurizing these Swiss rifles is a mistake. It depends entirely on the current stock/rifle relationship, and in the past 20 years I've proven that many times over right here in the SP armoury. Do what works best for you, and it might be that your k31's preloaded stock is perfectly fine, but because of the age and storage of these rifles, I've found that to be the exception........ Not the rule.




How do I "refurbish" my swiss stock?


Beech Stocks.

The original is Shellaq. Use alcohol to remove the old Shellaq
Do not immerse the stock or get the interior wood overly wet.
Rub Scrub stock hard and quickly with warm soapy water and a scrub brush.
Rub dry immediately with a Terry towel and let stand overnight.
Use the directional steamer to raise the dents..

Apply new coats of clear Shellaq. Some Shellaqs have a yellow or red tinge. That's ok.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Walnut Stocks Do not immerse the stock or get the interior wood overly wet.
Rub Scrub stock hard and quickly with warm soapy and a scrub brush.
Rub dry with a Terry towel and let stand overnight.
Use the directional steamer to raise the dents.

A) Use 000 Copper Wool to smooth the surfaces.
Hand rub with raw linseed oil until you have a warm smooth finish.
This may take a number of coats.

B) Sanding is less preferable unless you're going for a new rifle appearance.
Sand smooth but use a wood block taking care not to round any of the
edges or the fingergrooves. Do not overly sand the Cartouche.
Rub vigorously with a rough Terry towel.
Apply a coat of Tung Oil with a soft cloth and let dry. Lightly rub down
with 000 Copper Wool. Repeat this process 6 to 10 times until you have
a deep, warm glow to the wood. If you want a glossier finish, don't Copper
Wool the last coat. I prefer the satin look, so I do use it on the final coat. __________________
Latigo and P




Further notes on advanced Reloading


This is a touchy subject in some circles, so I'll do my best to avoid any coloration of the history. I've been working with Swiss rifles since the late 50s. I've been developing load data since 1963 as the manuals then extant were erroneous in their representation of both pressures and strength of the receivers. For whatever reason, the manual publishers were basing all of their load data on the Schmidt Rubin model 1889. The GP11 cartridge was the issue cartridge for the Schmidt Rubin beginning with the 1911sr. This is the same cartridge issued today for the PE57 autoloader and the predecessors, 1911, k11, k31 and the Sniper zfk3155. Does it not then stand to reason that the 1911 and k31, being designed to fire the same cartridge as the PE57, would have receivers of a strength equal to the modern autoloader? Would it surprise you to know that the factory in Bern offered the k31 in 7.5 Swiss, .308, 30/06 and 300 Winchester Magnum? It still is. You can buy one today from the Hammerli facility. But I digress. Early reloading manuals assumed that the bolts on the 1911s, k11s and k31s were identical to the 1889. Not so at all. The 1889 could NOT stand the pressures developed by the GP11 and therefore the publishers relegated all data and warnings to all of the Schmidt Rubins! Gross error! I discovered this error very early on, called Bern, spoke to an armourer, explained my theory, he agreed and I began a lifelong search for the commercial accuracy loads for the SRs. BTW......... I found it. In fact a number of them. The locking lugs on the earlier SRs were at the back of the bolt itself. This meant that the case head of the cartridge was largely unsupported, but with the advent of the 1911 the lugs were moved midway up the bolt proper and provided more than enough support for the case head. The 1911 receiver was also substantially stronger than the 1889, in fact strong enough to allow importers in the late 70s/early 80s to convert a large number of imported 1911s to .308. CUP for the 7.5 is around 42,000. The .308 is 50,000+, so that should also tell you that the 1911 receiver/bolt combo is plenty strong. The k31 amd the zfk3155 have the strongest of the bolt/receiver combinations. The locking lugs were moved forward right to the head of the bolt. The 30-06 and 300 winmag are no problem for this rifle. Enough preface. The dies.
I was asked to develop a forum for these rifles about 4 years ago (1999). I spent a tremendous amount of time educating new SR owners who had not a clue as to proper load data or accurizing. (I won't get into the accurizing thing at this point) Having been supplied with load data, a number of these folks began reloading the caliber. Within one month I had 3 incidents of "gas blow-by" from those using Lee 7.5 Swiss dies. The bolt of the SR provides a channel directly to the rear, allowing blow-by gasses to "kiss" the face of the shooter! Three more incidents followed with another 4 months. FAR too many for coincidence. Lee makes an excellent die. I've also been told that the circumstances surrounding the SRs don't happen with all Lee 7.5 dies. I don't know. I also have never had an interest in testing these dies. There's no point. I do assume that there is an inherent problem with using the die for this caliber. I can tell you that my son is not allowed to use Lee dies for reloading his 7.5 Swiss brass. In the past 5 years not one single incident of blow-by has ever been reported to me on swissrifles.com involving RCBS 7.5, Redding Comp or Hornady dies. There are others that work well too. Take your pick.
I can't tell you how many thousands of rounds in that caliber I've reloaded in 55 years or so, but its a bunch. Never one single failure involving the die has occurred. I'm loathe to retype the whole thing here as its quite long, but please do read the reloading for the 7.5 Swiss page before proceeding with reloading for your rifle. It will give you needed insight into the whys and wherefores. Thank you..... Pierre St.Marie *NOTE: Its been at least 4 years since I've heard about a Lee problem with this caliber. Maybe it's solved. Latigo *
__________________ In the "standard die" sets, other than the user's perceived quality differences, no difference between Reddidndg and RCBS. Both are for the k31 and the G11.
But when it comes to the Precision and Competition dies, only the user's track record is important, and for us, Redding has no competition.
Redding: Redding Competition Bushing 3-Die Neck Sizer Set 6.5 - MPN: 58446 This is the best from RCBS RCBS Gold Medal Match Series Bushing 2-Die Set 224 - MPN: 11205 "Nothing is cast in stone" with dies. Your own end result is all that's important no matter whose dies they are.
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In case you missed this one: Competition Bushing Sizing Die -- With this die, the cartridge case is completely supported and aligned with the sizing bushing before the sizing process begins. As the sizing process starts, the cartridge case remains supported in the tightly chambered sliding sleeve as it moves upward while the resizing bushing self centers on the case neck. The decapping rod is maintained in precise alignment by using the internal parts of the die as a linear support much like a firing pin. While the micrometer adjustment of the bushing position delivers precise control to the desired amount of the neck length to be sized. (Bushings are sold separately)
•The Body Die -- is designed to full length resize the case body only and bump the shoulder position for proper chambering without disturbing the case neck. It is intended for use only to resize cases which have become increasingly difficult to chamber after repeated firing and neck sizing.
•Competition Seating Die -- The bullet guide to seating stem fit is so precise that the seating stem can actually be demonstrated to float on a column of air. The micrometer is calibrated in .001" increments. It also has a zero set feature that allows you to zero the micrometer to your rifle or favorite seating depth. Add the Coaxial press system and you have the epitome of a reloading setup. ....... and I believe there might be one or two other press Mfg's that make a coax press. I'm just old and set in my ways.
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Now that you've had a chance to read about the well lubricated and smooth running gears of potential Precision Reloading, (there are more factors involved, but..) let's throw a monkey wrench into the whole thing. Many years ago I had a friend and two aquaintances that were bench resters. All of their reloading was done at their bench at matches. I'm sure you've seen the hand loading kits with the decapper, primer inserter, projectile seater etc. and......... a small yellow dipper? I have a Lyman and one other I can't remember, both in our caliber but have never used them. He would take a primed, prep'd case, the desired, proven projectile profile and weight, a small wide mouthed canniser of the required powder, a yellow dipper which he had filed down to the specific grain volume for the desired powder weight, dip the yellow dipper into the cannister and, with a credit card...... flick it across the top of the dipper and dump the powder into his case. He then used his hand held projectile seater and proceeded to shoot his 500 or 1,000 yard groups downrange. Would you like to guess as to his results? ........ so.......... Are you going to reload with a dipper and a credit card? LOL
Only if you have an awful lot of spare hours for that methodology and, needless to say, his case prep did involve both inside and outside case mouth truing. I'll get into that later, and we actually do the inside truing. Our method produces very close to bench rest load results but is much faster in volume.
I read a lot about a k31 rifle that's capable of MOA shooting, and the truth is that most of them are. It's not just the projectile and powder selection. The case prep and neck tension are equally important, but not often worked on. Your SD being very low is very important. Coaxial alignment or the case base, neck and projectile are also a very crucial part of the formula. Latigo reloads on a Forster press, and only on a Forster when he wants absolute accuracy. The die "floats" and aligns itself with the case on every stroke. All of his precision dies are Redding Comp dies. A lot of guys will look at this and say....... "yeah, well, maybe he has time for all that"......... And it's the difference between vying for 1.25" groups and everyone putting in their 2 cents about going up a grain....... down 1.5 grains, different projectile, change powders and a thread on it some 60 posts long or......... Just posting a photo of your entirely repeatable results. Not magic, not rocket science.......... just dedication, and once you're there, you'll never go back.




Notes on Reloading #2


There are two directions the reloader for the Swiss 7.5x55 can take as concerns our approach. Assuming you've already read our initial approach, you may choose to end it there. This next step will take you into increasing accuracy and developing repeatable targets. Case prep is, for us, easily 95% of the repeatable round process. From here on you'll need a Chronograph. It's the only way to measure your success in the reloading process. The term "Standard Deviation +or -" (SD) means the difference between your fastest and slowest round fired. That deviation is very dependent on the "neck tension" of your resized case, or, in other words, how tightly the neck grips the projectile when it passes through your bullet seater. Two things will control that. The amount of the neck gripping the projectile, and how tightly the projectile is gripped. Both will greatly affect the SD, and the further downrange you shoot, the more critical that becomes. The smaller the SD, the better. Remember that we're talking about our caliber only. Other calibers will behave differently and will require or allow far more variables because of the short throated chamber of the k31. Yes, I'm well aware of the 911 series being a bit different in the throat, but also keep in mind that the GP11 cartridge was developed in Bern for ALL of the Swiss rifles (save the 1889 and earlier) from the G11 right through the MG51..... All using the identical cartridge, and all with the very accurate end result for a production military issue cartridge. The first control of neck tension will be, after full length resizing, trimming to an absolutely identical length. This will control the amount/length of the case neck gripping the projectile. If you've already bought your press and dies, this might be as far as you want to take it..... But if you're going to the next logical step in controlling neck tension, you'll buy a set of Redding Comp dies. This will allow you to full length size (FLS) the case body and resize the neck seperately. Why? Because by using a Redding collet you can assure that the neck tension is as uniform as possible through this step. You may want to buy two collets...... One at your known caliber size and one the next size down. Only seating the projectile in "your particluar press" is going to determine which one suits your particular projectile factual size. "Aren't they all identical? No. From Mfg. to Mfg. there can be a difference so slight that simple measureing might not show any real difference. All Sierra's may be the same, but switch to Berger or Hornady or any others may not be absolutely identical, and with neck tensions, we require identical performance. "Nit picking"? Maybe, but your long range targets are going to tell you. Seat depth. I can tell you that the GP11 has already provided an optimum seat depth. K31's greatly prefer having the ogive no more than 2 or 3 thou's off the lands. Assuming your case prep is satisfactory at this point, that small jump from case neck to lands/grooves becomes the focal point of accuracy. The G11 series of rifles also greatly prefer the GP11 seat depth. Remember that you're (for the moment) using different powders and different projectile profiles than the issue GP11 cartridge. You've already read the original introduction to reloading previously written, so you know how to test seat depth performances based on Ogive/Lands contact and the OAL required for your chosen projectile. Don't forget......... seat depth and OAL are only relevant to a specific projectile you've chosen for reloading. I'll post the final steps we use here at SP later. The foregoing will take you to a good starting or even a good finish point with the presses and dies you now have. If you'd like to "free range" with projectile profiles and powders, go to Swissproductsusa.com and click on the FAQ and open the "What Projectlies and Powders Do I begin With?" That one has 45 years of condensed load data posted with the exception of RE17 which I will cover later.




Brass


RUAG Boxer Swiss National Match brass......... the finest on the planet.
Ok. So here's how the American reloading part of it began for the k31, the G11's, the zfk55 and the Pe57. I don't remember the year, sometime in the 90's but a lot of shooters on the various Swiss Forums and elsewhere will remember better than I do because they bought it from me.......... My memory has gotten terrible......We brought in some 10,000 Ruag Swiss National Match Brass, but before that, I called Grafs and three other outfits asking if they'd like to front this buy and handle it themselves. "What? 7.5x what? For what rifles? never heard of them"..... So....... we brought it in.
Within two weeks the whole bunch was gone. I called Grafs again. "What?!? You sold it all already?" Yep...... and I'm about to bring in another 50,000 of the same brass, and another 150,000 as soon as that's gone. I expect about a month. "Wait, wait wait! Do you want us to handle that?" I put them in direct touch with Ruag in Bern, and......... that's how it all began for US reloaders. I have an awful lot of Norma brass here, but if you really do a lot of reloading, you already know how soft Norma brass is. I can't remember how much RUAG brass we have, but if you anneal every 5 cycles, you're going to be working on that first 200 brass for an awfully long time. I have yet to have any RUAG brass fail on me, and you can guess how many rounds I've sent down range here over the past 18 or 20 years since we did that first import............ That incredible boxer brass was cut off for export maybe 10 years ago when RUAG began their Commercial Loads for sales to Europe. Can't remember for sure , but that's when Grafs began working with PRVI Partisan for brass and loaded cartridges and our own 18 year association with Graf's began. Now the last reserves run of GP11 in 1995 are nearly gone, but RUAG began a new run two years ago. It's still that great Swiss National Match brass and still labeled GP11, but it's also still Berdan primed. The wax ring is gone since log term storage is no longer necessary. The last firearm in the Swiss Army requiring the crimp is the MG51, and that will very soon be replaced by the FN Minimi, so........ no crimp required for the 7.5x55 caliber with all the select mode rifles no longer in service. As for loaded cartridges, Norma manufactures them and PRVI Partison, or PPU may be purchased through Graf and sons. GP11 brass may also be reloaded, but will be covered in another section.




How do I align my front Tunnel Sight to the Bore?


To correctly install the clamp on front sight, place the rifle between your knees with the butt on the floor. Now tighten up your Allen screws so you're just able to rotate the site left and right. Looking straight down the muzzle, align the neck of the globe site perfectly in line with the blade of the issue front sight. That should put you dead center. Tighten down the left front Allen screw first then the right rear Allen screw then the right front Allen screw and finally the left rear Allen screw.




hBN and What are Impact Coated Projectiles and what is the process?


Ok. Forget everything you've read on the net about hBN Hexagonal Boron Nitride. Processes I've seen posted fall far short of being effective, and may that try it eventually give up because "the process is too time consuming and the results minimal". No, they're not minimal if it's done correctly. The US Navy began using hBN on large deck guns a very long time ago. This involved use in production of items using fine gears, sprockets and anything requiring a very long term dry lubricant, have been using hBN in a nozzeled spray form for years. The product is patented and I've provided a link to that patent if you really want a long and extremely dry read. I did read it and followed up with a call to the Canadian outfit I buy it from. After a 1/2 hour conversation with a gent in the lab, I began formulation our own process, and after 7 years, I can tell you that it is indeed effective. Proof? Only your own observations of a couple of control,rifles with a Hawkeye Pro Borescope and an awful lot of projectiles down range will tell you. I spent three summers producing ICPs, and there are many thousands of ICPs in various calibers in the reloading room. All were purchased in 500 or 1,000 lot groups and then ID'd with a red dot on the original boxes.
No rifle or handgun here sends a round downrange that isn't an ICP. , so.................... here we go.
================================ Your bore is going to make a difference right out of the gate. Both Moly and hBN have specific applications. Lab Grade Moly is typically 99.8% pure with a 1 to 3 micron size. hBN (far more preferrable in [i]most[/i] bores) is typically negative 5 micron or smaller. First, hBN. The patent shows it as being most effective on a standard steel bore, less effective on a 17-4 S/S Electro Polished bore, this because the negative micron particles cannot ingrain themselves as well into the surface and create the required ceramic protective coating. hBN is not susceptible to moisture and thus does not allow corrosion to affect the lands/grooves of the bore. This is a rather large advantage over Moly.
The process is simple. If you've ever fired a copper jacketed projectile in your rifle, use a water based copper removal specific such as Wipe Out. Whatever you use, make sure its water based and ammonia free. Once you've borescoped and found the bore to be completely copper free, if the bore is .30 caliber, roll a .270 (or whatever, but a bit smaller diameter than your bore) caliber [i]clean[/i] swab in a mixture of 100% Denatured Alcohol and hBN. Use a small, sealable pill bottle, glass or plastic to mix and store the slurry. The ratio should replicate a slurry the consistency of milk. Run it back and forth through the bore.
Within minutes I fire an impact coated projectile through the bore and that's it. The bore is effectively ceramic coated. Everyone has a methodology and most involve pill bottles in the tumbler suspended in media. I don't. I use 16oz plastic pharmacy jars with screw on lids, and not inside the tumbler suspended in the media.
All four jars are filled to the 1/3rd mark with impact coated .177 steel BBs. The BBs must be washed in Dawn or cleaned with a Sonic Vibrator and denatured alcohol. Add a nominal 1.5gr of hBN to each jar. Place 50 .30 caliber (or whatever, untouched by human hands) clean projectiles in each jar, add a nominal .5gr of hBN and vibrate for three hours. The jars impact coat the projectiles easily 4 times harder and faster than in a pill bottle suspended inside the tumbler in media. Once the lids are screwed down tight, use a 1/2" wide strip of plastic tape around the area between the lid and the jar.
Negative 5 micron hBN is so fine it can find it's way through the threads.Use a large slotted spoon to remove the impact coated projectiles from the jars and tumble them in a Terrycloth towel. We begin by stripping the chambers, throats and bore with Wipe Out. Its an ammonia free, water based bore cleaner that removes literally everything. Carbon, copper, any kind of fouling including Moly. We leave the Foam Type Wipe Out in the bore and throat for about two hours then dry swab everything. We do a follow-up inspection for any copper residue with a Hawekeye Borescope. A complete, 100% copper free bore is essential. I wash the bullets in very hot, soapy water with Dawn. I use a bowl with a plastic strainer that just fits in it. Once washed, I thorougly rinse with hot water, not cold. From that point I handle the projectiles as little as possible and then only with disposable latex gloves. Assuming you've already treated the .177 steel BBs, you can put 50 .30 caliber or 100 smaller caliber bullets in each jar.
We place a thin layer of dense foam in the bottom of the Dillon. The jars are sealed where the top threads down onto the jar with plastic electrical tape to keep any hBN from leaking out. We place the jars on their sides and pack them in with chunks of foam. We place enough foam on top of them so that when the vibrator lid is screwed down they're trapped tightly. This keeps everything horizontal and the bullets stay on the horizontal position. Works much better and you won't need a specialty lid for your Dillon. With hBN, heat is absolutely necessary. In Winter, we use heat in the form of a Halogen body shop lamp. Placement of the lamp is critical for the well-being of your tumbler. Too close and you'll soften the plastic. Vibrate them for 3 hours and roate the containers at the 1.5 hour mark. . Remove them with a slotted spoon and tumble them in a Terry towel a few times. They'll come out perfect. This horizontal impact coating with steel BBs in a vibrator with no media makes them hit hard and fast, and that's the secret to perfect coating. Even small ballistic tipped bullets come out perfectly with no damage to the plastic/lead tips at all. Photos of the correct sequence for impact coating projectiles (ICP's) will follow soon




What are Hard-Cast Projectiles and how do I make them?


We have maybe 4 to 500 pounds of wheel weights from the late 80's and early 90's. For whatever reason, they're all a nominal BH factor of 9 to begin with.
I bought a 2 gallon bucket of Anthimony from the outfit here in Thompson falls that manufactures it. It's all in a rock form. The expensive stuff you buy from a store is in a (preferred) powder form, so........... we have to crunch it as small as we can with a mall. Once its in a granulated state, you can add it to the BH9 lead in your pot. It MUST be taken up to 1,100 degrees minimum for it to melt and mix into the lead. We do have a Lyman Electric Lead Pot, however.......... being inescapably old school, I don't use the bottom load spout. I still use the dipper. I only depend on the Lyman for controlled temperatures. Latigo also prefers to use the dipper. You also must take great care NOT to add too much. It takes a very small amount, measured in a fraction of grains. I remember doing just that years ago and found I could take the BH factor up to 32+, and the projectiles shattered upon target impact! ........ so, we use a BH factor of 18, and we can actually cast a .22 caliber projectile for the .223's that will push right at 3,200 fps.
........ but we also "case harden" projectiles that are pushing close to FMJ FPS or better projectiles. How do we do it? Ma's explanation is "NOT IN MY STOVE OR KITCHEN...... EVER AGAIN!!" Solution? We have a smaller counter top type oven. We do all of our casting outside anway, so........ It's the perfect solution. No Darning Eggs required. LOL! So.... we cast the caliber, lube it through the Swager the first time in the diameter of the caliber, but that first Swager is 1/1000th over the size of the slugged bore.
Next comes the Case Hardening, and you have to pay close attention to the projectiles during the process.
Either in one of the smaller, portable ovens, (or in Ma's oven the first time before she kicked me out) with the temperature at 215 degrees. Stand them all upright, side by side in a shallow tray.......... Now you watch to see when they begin to aquire a glossy sheen. Remove them immediately and let them cool naturally...... No water dumping. Now you're going to put them through the bullet Swager again, but........ this time it's through a Companion Swager that's 1/1000th smaller in diameter, matching the original slugged bore dimension making sure to run plenty of lube into the Swager...... What you do not want to do is break the surface and destroy the case hardening you've accomplished. Now, if they're to be hunting loads,......... the tricky part. That case hardening must be broken on just the flat tip of the projectiles. You can use a flat, semi-fine file, BUT..... the projectile MUST be filed perfectly flat and 90 degrees to the sidewall. If not....... your projectiles will not print a moa POI at any real range. Probably ok (maybe) out to 100 yards, but the further out, the worse the group with noses that aren't true. I prefer sand paper.
It's true that a BH factor above 12 won't allow the bullet to expand much, but you can sure boost that FPS factor up to, and equal to a FMJ. Now.......... an' you ain' gunna like dis wun........ You want to reach the velocities in the reloading books? Yep. you guessed it. hBN ICPs...... and only fired through a Slurry Sealed bore. You've already seen the process, and making ICPs out of these is fast. Each jar can take an easy 50 to 80 at a time, depending on your tumbler/vibrator.




Diopter History


Swiss matches world wide. We couldn't patent the outer shell of the Diopter because Wyss in Switzerland held that, but we were able to patent the inner workings of the P/S because it was completely different than the old Swiss original. Another company in Germany attempted to duplicate the P/S in 2013 but our Distributor in the Netherlands suppled his own attorney to stop that production. We're the first and only American company that has approval for Firearm Accessory sales in Switzerland. That took us a long time. How the P/S Diopter came to be, and the story of the first production P/S
We developed out first Diopter because the ones in production both in Switzerland and Germany had obvious shortcomings. Anyone who owns an “original” Diopter knows this. The Diopter was never a Bern manufacture and has nothing to do with Army issue items. They were originally all made by “cottage industries” in Switzerland and Germany, so ther are no "originals". The "original" Diopters have a real flaw. If you traverse the windage to the maximum in both directions you’ll see a gap open up exposing the inside of the Diopter to dirt, sand, whatever. The Matrix also “cocks” itself off true horizontal. You’ll also notice that when you mount the Diopter, to achieve a true axis alignment to the front sight and the bore, you have to begin with a left windage setting. We completely redesigned the interior workings of the Diopter to correct all of that. The Steel Type P/S only came about because of demands from the Swiss SSV. Without those changes they would not give us approval for Swiss Sanctioned Matches worldwide, so………….. We developed the Type P/S and gave it a 1,000 yard capability to boot, so………………….. How our Diopters were designated. It’s not something I did. Frank Van Binnendijk (Guisan) posted the designation on his own when we did our first show & tell. He called it the Type P. Maybe a week went by when I asked him why he had given it that designation. He asked. “What’s your name?” Well………….. its Pierre. *D’Oh!* ………and that is how it was named. Subsequently there was the Type PII, and that one clamped on the existing scope sight that many shooters already had. It allowed the Scope and Type PII Diopter to be quickly changed from one to the other. The Type PIIC was simply the entire system with the Clamp On Scope Mount included. All were aluminum at that time. It took nearly 8 years to gain SSV approval, and our SP Distributor in Switzerland had a lot to do with it. We submitted 3 different protypes ove that period, and they were all turned down, one after the other, but.......... The odd thing is that they never made it back to the US. The simply disappeared into the SSV. LOL My frustration level was rather high, so we developed a Steel Diopter with a radical new internal op-system. We were able to accomplish 75 out to 1,000+ yards with this one. But it had to be proofed by someone who was both qualified and not connected to SP in any way. Enter US Naval Distinguished Marksman, Robert L. Steinberg. Bob provided the testing we needed before submitting this new design to the SSV in Switzerland. I have his proof results around here somewhere, and I'll post it as soon as I locate it. It's around 5 years ago now. So................. in appreciation for his efforts in provind the P/S at Quantico, we dedicated the very first production Type P/S off the line to him. We were accepted by the Swiss SSV in 2012, I think. (OGS again.) Latigo not only engraved the dedication on the Diopter, but he also made a presentation case for Mr. Steinberg, acknowledgeing our sincere appreciation. Now with the advent of the new Adjustable Front Sight, even the old Type P’s and PIIs will achieve the 1,000 yard ability.
As of the end of next week, the new P11 Diopters will be on the way to Grafs. This one will use the 1911 Clamp-On-Mount and work with the 1889, Kadett, 1896, 96/11, the G11 and the K11 rifles.
Time to clarify and save me a BUNCH of PM/email answering. Question: Why are the Swiss Products Diopters as expensive as they are now? Three years ago my friend Frank Van Binnendijk asked me if he could show our interior design to Daniel Wyss. He was interested in what we were doing. Wyss is a HUGE weapons and accessory manufacturer in Switzerland. He was intrigued by our 1,000+ yard capablility. He also made one that went to 1,000 yards, but not a stand-alone system. If a shooter wanted to go beyond 500 yards, he was obliged to make a rail change in the Diopter, but then he couldn't go down to 100 yards without changing rails back again. Latigo printed up a large photo of our PS Diopter interior and cost factors and sent it to Frank for Daniel Wyss with my blessing. One week later Frank was in Switzerland and spoke to Daniel again and gave him a larger copy. The answer came rather quickly. He was told that a diopter with the capablity of the PS with the myriad of parts such as double-spring systems etc, could not be manufactured for even 10% more than Graf's retail price. Those of you familiar with the original Swiss and German Diopters know that it all hinged on one, large spring in the upper right corner of the Diopter that handled both windage and elevation. The PS and G11 Diopters are a very far cry from both the original and present day Diopters from Switzerland and Germany. We cost count every single part in the Mfg. of our Diopters and our markup is the same as every Mfg in the country does, just to keep us afloat. I'll copy and paste this for future PMs and emails.




Swiss Rifle Mfg Dating.


Manufacture Dates: To determine the date of manufacture of a particular rifle, one needs to know both the model and the serial number. Given the model, go to the appropriate table and look for the range of serial numbers that spans the given serial number. The corresponding date for that serial number is shown in the left column of the table. For example, given a Model 1911 with a serial number of 2673xx, the tables show no such serial number for a Model 1911. There is a range spanning this serial number for a Model 1889/96, however, showing a manufacture date of 1900. Knowing that the M89/96s were converted to approximate the M1911 form, we conclude that this rifle is a Model 1889/96/11 manufactured in 1900.
As another example, given a Model 1931 with a serial number of 9999xx, the tables indicate that this rifle was manufactured in 1953.
Note: Some rifles will have an uppercase P either after or below the serial number. Upon retirement from active duty, the retiring Swiss soldier was given the opportunity to keep his service rifle. Rifles so obtained were stamped with the uppercase P near the serial number, and should not be confused with the "Private" series of rifles indicated in the tables below. The "Private" series of rifles were manufactured to fill special orders with the factory (such as for export). [b]Model 1889 - Training Rifles (Instruktionsgewehre)[/b] Year Quantity Serial numbers 1893 40 E1-E39 (E20 doubled)
1895 2 E43, E45
1896 2 E42, E44
[b]Model 1889 - Repeating Rifles (Repetiergewehre) Manufacture ended on April 29, 1897[/b] Year Quantity Serial numbers 1891 24900 1-24900
1892 90100 24901-115000
1893 59100 115001-174100
1894 8787 174101-174887 175001-183000
1895 12500 183001-195500
1896 12500 195501-208000
1897 4000 208001-212000 [b]Cavalry Carbine Model 1893 (Kavalleriekarabiner)[/b] Year Quantity Serial numbers 1896 250 4251-4500
1897 250 4501-4750
1898 250 4751-5000
1899 250 5001-5250
1900 400 5251-5650
1901 500 5651-6150
1902 500 6151-6650
1903 500 6651-7150
1904 300 7151-7450
1905 300 7451-7750
1895-1905 96 P1-P96 - Private series,numbers P46-P84 for a commercial company, Paris
1897-1903 11 E1-E11, extra series,entry in the export book of Waffenfabrik Bern [b]Model 1889/96 - Training Rifles (Instruktionsgewehre)[/b] Year Quantity Serial numbers 1897 2 E2-E3
1899 4 E4-E7
1900 4 E8-E11
1904 4 E12-E15
1908 4 E16-E19 [b]Model 1889/96 - Repeating Rifles (Repetiergewehre) Manufacture ended in November 1912[/b] Year Quantity Serial numbers 1895 50 1-50
1897 9000 212001-221000
1898 15500 221001-236500
1899 15500 236501-252000
1900 16500 252001-268500
1901 11500 268501-280000
1902 12000 280001-292000
1903 10000 292001-302000
1904 8000 302001-310000
1905 6000 310001-316000
1906 6000 316001-322000
1907 5000 322001-327000
1908 5000 327001-332000
1909 4800 332001-336800
1910 6300 336801-343100
1911 1900 343101-345000
1912 4000 345001-349000 [b]Model 1897 Cadet Rifles (Kadettengewehre) Sub-caliber Trainers (per J. Walter) (Einsatzgewehre)[/b] Year Quantity Serial numbers 1899 18 E1-E18
1900 6 E19-E24
1901 9 E25-E33
1902 3 E34-E36 (P9+P34?)
1903 2 E37-E38
1904 1 E39
1907 1 E40 (P40) [b]Model 1897 Cadet Rifles (Kadettengewehre)[/b] Year Quantity Serial numbers 1898 2100 1-2100
1899 1649 2101-3749
1900 1580 3750-5329
1901 499 5330-5828
1902 193 5829-6021
1903 232 6022-6253
1904 151 6254-6404
1905 114 6405-6518
1906 183 6519-6701
1907 150 6702-6851
1908 82 6852-6933
1909 37 6934-6970
1910 236 6971-7206
1911 99 7207-7305
1912 115 7306-7420
1914 231 15001-15231
1915 33 15232-15264
1916 70 15265-15334
1918 2 15335-15336
1924 26 15337-15362
1925 20 15363-15382
1926 80 15383-15462
1927 15 15463-15477 1898-1919 45 P1-P45, Private series entry in the export book of Waffenfabrik Bern [b]Model 1889/1900 Short Rifles (Kurze Gewehre)[/b] Year Quantity Serial numbers 1901 5000 1-5000
1902 885 5001-5885
1903 915 5886-6800
1904 1000 6801-7800
1905 1500 7801-9300
1906 1500 9301-10800
1907 1750 10801-12550
1908 1750 12551-14300
1909 1650 14301-15950
1910 1500 15951-17450
1911 1300 17451-18750 ? 176 P1-P176 [sic], Private series,entry in the export book of Waffenfabrik Bern 1903 Zoll 89 P72-P150
1904 Zoll 300 P173-P472
? 50 P501-P550
Zoll 394 P551-P944
Zoll 190 P951-P1140
Zoll 103 P1141-P1243
Note: Zoll - Customs service [b]Model 1905 Cavalry Carbines (Kavalleriekarabiner)[/b] Year Quantity Serial numbers 1906 810 1-810
1907 2790 811-3600
1908 2600 3601-6200
1909 500 6201-6700
1910 600 6701-7300
1911 600 7301-7900
1906-1914 39 P1-P39, Private series,entry in the export book of Waffenfabrik Bern [b]Model 1896/11 Infantry Rifles (Infanteriegewehre) These rifles carry the serial numbers of the Model 1896 rifles from which they were modified[/b] Year Quantity 1912 5000
1913 40000
1914 51000
1915 38000
1916 1500
1918 200
1919 50
1920 20 [b]Model 1911 Infantry Rifles (Infanteriegewehre) Manufacture ended on October 1, 1919[/b] Year Quantity Serial numbers 1912 6000 355001-361000
1913 14000 349001-355000 361001-369000
1914 5000 369001-374000
1915 22000 374001-396000
1916 32000 396001-428000
1917 31000 428001-459000
1918 20000 459001-479000
1919 3000 479001-482000 ? 200 P5000-P5200, Private series,last manufactured on October 10, 1919,entry in the export book of Waffenfabrik Bern
? 1 P5219
? 698 P5251-P5948 [b]Model 1911 Carbines (Karabiner) Manufacture ended on July 11, 1933[/b] Year Quantity Serial numbers 1914 6000 30001-36000
1915 4000 36001-40000
1916 13000 40001-53000
1917 16100 53001-54400 55001-62000* 62301-70000**
1918 19000 70001-89000
1919 2000 89001-91000
1920 6500 91001-97500
1921 8500 97501-106000
1922 7500 106001-113500
1923 7900 113501-121400
1924 7600 121401-129000
1925 7500 129001-136500
1926 9900 136501-146400
1927 12600 146401-159000
1928 11500 159001-170500
1929 12800 170501-183300
1930 9900 183301-193200
1931 8800 193201-202000
1932 9200 202001-211200
1933 3900 211201-215100
1913-1919 300 P2001-P2300,
Private seriesentry in the export book of Waffenfabrik Bern
Zoll 18 P2013-2030
Zoll 8 P2037-P2044
Zoll 30 P2071-P2100
Zoll 100 P2101-P2200
without entries 4 P2201-P2204
? 19 P2205-P2223
Zoll 50 P2251-P2300 Notes:Zoll - Customs service* Serial numbers 54401-55000 and 62001-62300 are missing (900 pieces)** Serial numbers 69701-69750 have double entries, but are only entered once in this list. Consequently, the total of the Model 1911 Carbines listed here comes to 185150 pieces. [b]Special Model 1911 Rifles (Extra-Gewehre)[/b] YearWhoSerial numbers 1915 Kriegstechnische Abteilung, Bern - E500
1914 Koenigliche Gewehrpruefungskommission, Ruheleben-Spandau -Spanische Gesandtschaft, Bern - E501E502
1919 Emile Galley, Lausanne - E503
1920 Hollaendische Gesandtschaft, Bern -Englische Gesandtschaft, Bern - E504E505
1915 Eidgenpessiosches Militaerdepartement, Bern - E506-E507
1917 Sektion fuer Munition, Thun - E508
1918 Amerikanische Gesandtschaft, Bern - E509
1919 Franzoesische Gesandtschaft, Bern - E510
1920 Franzoesische Kriegsministerium, Paris -Tiro Suizo, Buenos Aires - E511-E520E521-E522
1921 Italienische Gesandtschaft, Bern -Italienischer Militaerattache, Bern -Flugplatzdirektion, Duebendorf -Sektion fuer Schiessversuche, Thun - E523 E524 E525 E526-E527
1922 Eidgenoessische Munitionsfabrik, Thun -Eidgenoessische Munitionsfabrik, Thun -Internationales Wettschiessen, Mailand -The High Commissioner for the Commonwealth of Australia, London - E525? E528-E529 E530 E531
1923 Franzoesisches Kriegsministerium, Paris - E532
1924 Eidgenoessisches Schuetzenfest, Aarau -KTA, fuer Schweden -KTA, fuer Tschechoslowakei - E533-E534 E535 E536
1925 KTA, fuer Waffenfabrik Oviedo -KTA, Bern -Schiessschule Walenstadt - E537 E538-E539 E540-E541
1926 Afghanische Regierung (mit Dolch 18) -KTA, fuer Tschechoslowakei - E542 E543
1934 J. Alder W+F, Bern - E544
Notes:KTA - Kriegstechnischen Abteilung des schweizerischen MilitaerdepartementsW+F - Waffenfabrik [b]Special Model 1911 Carbines (Extra-Karabiner)[/b] Year Who Serial numbers 1918 Amerikanische Gesandtschaft, Bern E1
1919 Amerikanische Gesandtschaft, Bern E2
1920 Hollaendische Gesandtschaft, Bern -Tiro Suizo, Buenos Aires -Tiro Suizo, Buenos Aires - E3E 5E6
1921 Direktion Eidgenoessische Waffenfabrik, Bern E7
1923 Franzoesisches Kriegsministerium, Paris E4
1926 Afghanische Regierung E8
1932 Wojskorny Zaklad, Warschau -Werkzeugmaschinenfabrik, Oerlikon - E9E10
1952 unreadable E11
[b]Model 1911 Carbines (Karabiner) Converted from Model 1889/1900 Short Rifles and Model 1905 Cavalry Carbines[/b] Year Quantity 1913 1000
1914 8000
1915 8000
1916 8200
1917 900
1918 100
1919 70
1920 65 [b]Model 1911 Trials Carbines (Versuchs-Karabiner)[/b] Year Quantity Serial numbers 1923 KTA, Bern V1-V10
1926 KTA, fuer Schiessschule Walenstadt V1-V200
Note: KTA - Kriegstechnischen Abteilung des schweizerischen Militaerdepartements [b]Model 1931 Carbines (Karabiner)[/b] Year Quantity Serial numbers 1933 1193 520010-521202
1934 15534 521203-536736
1935 13664 536737-550400
1936 11326 550401-561727
1937 11639 561728-573366
1938 10344 573367-583700
1939 15300 583701-599000
1940 33575 599001-632575
1941 54150 632576-686725
1942 49350 686726-736075
1943 50475 736076-786550
1944 51900 786551-838450
1945 26200 838451-864650
1946 15600 864651-880250
1947 20950 880251-901200
1948 20100 901201-921300
1949 15500 921301-936800
1950 13200 936801-950000
1951 23050 950001-973050
1952 21400 973051-994450
1953 554 97450 994451-999 999215001-222450
1954 17150 222451-239600
1955 11250 239601-250850
1956 6400 250851-257250
1957 2950 257251-260200
1958 3130 260201-263330 [b]Model 1931 Carbines - Private series[/b] Year Quantity Serial numbers 1934 16 ?
1935 500 400001-400500
1936 100 Zoll 401001-401100
1937 150 Zoll200 401101-401250400501-400700
1938 150 400701-400850
1939 20 401501-401520
1940 1505305050 400851-401000401521-402050402151-402220402251-402300
1941 300 402301-402600
1942 650 402501[sic]-403150[sic]
1943 350 403151-403500
1944 400 403501-403900
1945 600 403901-404500
1946 837 404501-405337
1947 92930 405322[sic]-406250E519767-E519796
1948 400 406251-406650
1949 650 406651-407300
1950 40050 407301-407700 408001-408050
1951 30050 407701-408000 408051-408100
1952 300 408101-408400
1953 45050 408401-408850 409051-409100
1954 200100 408851-409050 409101-409200
1955 450100 409201-409650 410151-410250
1956 450 409651-410100
1957 50300 410101-410150 410251-410550
1958 475 410551-411025
1959 425 411026-411450
1960 300 411451-411750
1961 300 411751-412050
1962 400 412051-412450
1963 50400 267331-267380412451-412850
1968- 1969 150 various numbers
1971 15050 269431-269580269881-269930
Stand (?) 1972 250 various numbers
Note:Zoll - Customs service [b]Model 1931 serial number allocation, valid after November 1, 1952[/b][Note this table gives only the records of serial blocks allocated for various purposes. See the K31 tables above for yearly records of specific serial ranges actually marked on receivers.] Serial Numbers Allocation 215001-350000 K31 Carbine series, ordered by KTA for KMV
350001-400000 K31 Carbine series
P400001-P450000 Private K31 Carbine series
450001-500000 K31 Carbines with telescopic sights (sniper versions)
500001-500200 Trials versions
E519701-E519900 Various special K31s
519901-519999 Cutaway K31s (running backwards?), last number 519970
520001-520150 Carbine series ordered by KTA, delivered by W+F for special purposes
520081-520100 Ditto, reserved for W+F
520151-999999 Carbine series, ordered by KTA for KMV
after 550651 Hardened magazine boxes
after 540001 Hardened receivers
Notes:KTA - Kriegstechnischen Abteilung des schweizerischen MilitaerdepartementsKMV - KriegsmaterialverwaltungW+F - Waffenfabrik [b]Models 1931/42 and 1931/43 Sniper Rifles (Zielfernrohr-Karabiner)[/b] Year Quantity Serial numbers 1943 96 ?
1944 403 ?
1945 1537 ?
1946 205 ? [b]Model 1955 Sniper Rifles (Zielfernrohr-Karabiner)[/b] Year Quantity Serial numbers 1957 170 1001-1170
1958 3030 1171-4200
1959 800 4201-5000
? 150 5001-5150
Commemorative K31, 50 years 1931 - 1981 #001 - 500.
Original serials 270801 - 271300




Rifles Stamped with "P"


Sitting here eating my "Special K" for breakfast, it crossed my mind that I didn't know for sure how the Kellogg's company all began. I thought about it for a minute and then realized I'd forgotten what the point might have been. I can see 3 deer in the pasture right now........... so, What was I talking bout? Oh, yeah........ the special "P" on Swiss rifles. That must have been it all along, so............ Why is a rifle with that "Special P" so highly sought after. Let's think about this. The Kellog's company began in..... hm. Lets start again. Oh yeah. Swiss rifles. When a soldier mustered out of the service, he was given two options. Turn in his rifle or keep it to take home. If he opted to keep it, the armoury stamped a "P" on it, usually just ahead of the serial number, but not in all cases. Haemmerli also made an entire run of k31's made well after the war, and the were a private run for sales to citizens, et al. Also stamped with a "P", that signified their private run. That P was always done in the same font, same pressure and in perfect alignment with the serial number. Not too difficult to recognize, so..... what is the special attraction to the mustered out, "P" stamped rifles? Consider this. A rifle turned in to the armoury and never re-issued would not have been fired again after that point. A rifle released to the citizen soldier would very likely see an entire lifespan of being fired in the weekly or monthly meets in the villages or sponsored meets in the Swiss Clubs throughout the country. That would equal many hundreds of rounds fired through that "highly sought after" P stamped rifle......... so..... I think you can take it from there and put the rest of that logic together. That said......... I'm going back to my Special K. I thank you...... Kelloggs thanks you. Kelloggs Cereal Co. @1890




Reloading Presses


So...... you have a machine screw made to fit exactly into two copper plates the bottom plate threaded. The alignment looks perfect and you immediately feel a very minor resistance. You back it out an on closer inspection you can tell that the alignment is imperceptibly off....... not enough to really measure, but just enough that you have to add a bit more torque to seat the screw home than you really should....... But it fits and it's tight. You have a shell holder mounted at the base of your press. It's time for the resizing process. That press handle is heavy duty and the shell casing runs right up into the die, albeit with a bit of pressure you weren't quite expecting, but it goes home all the way and, upon extraction, it looks good. Now the seating die. Your projectile is either a boattail or a very slightly rounded edge on the base. It slides down into the case mouth, and you don't really detect any real resistance, or maybe the slightest bit, so......... What has just happened? You've (without really feeling it) just forced your shell case to align itself between the shell holder with the die....... You just did the same thing with your projectile, so.......... now both the shell case and projectile are at 90 degrees to the shell holder. Looks good....... feels straight..... roll it on the reloading bench and there's really no detectable wobble, but once it's chambered and fired, are those minute stresses that forced the shell case and projectile truly in dead alignment and absolutely concentric to
the bore? The body, for sure, but what about the case neck to the base? The neck to the projectile? With most all standard presses, absolute concentricity may or may not be absolutely true. Those minute differences only show up at real range, long distance. Everything goes into the equation when you reload. Sometimes they never show at all. Suppose your case went up into a die that was "floating" and centered itself freely with no side pressure from the shellholder? Suppose it also went up "into" the seating die and again...... centered itself on the floating seater? Now you have a case that is reloaded with no side thrust between a fixed shell holder and die. Perfect columnation with everything in dead alignment to the case body. Those are now three variables gone from your case prep. You've also, in all likelihood, just used a Forster press. Nit picking? Wasted time? Ask a few old benchresters, and while that's not what I'm directing you to, the fewer variables in your case prep and reloading..... the better. These are all very simple and oft overlooked aspects of reloading.




Primers and pockets.


Primer pockets:
You may have ended your case prep with the initial information in the "Reloading the 7.5x55" post, but if you're headed for the best case prep you can manage, then you'll want to include these steps.
Truing the Primer Pocket is essential for us. Cleaning with a P/P wire brush is a part of standard case prep, but you'll need to go a step further with "truing". This tool puts the pocket into a perfect receptor for your primers with a controllable depth cut. It can/does remove miniscule bits of brass,. but it also ensures a positive seating and dependable/equal ignition. As for seating........ This one goes a lot of different directions with available Primer Seaters. The RCBS press attachment, bench mounted and various hand seater tools and my personal favorite for absolutely consistent Primer seating, the Forster Press seater on the top of the press itself. Forster and a number of other Mfg's make their versions and Forster also makes a bench top type, but when the smoke clears, it's very important that your primer seating is absolutely repeatable with every round. If you're using "once fired" Military Brass you may need to buy a Swaging tool. This tool opens up the primer pocket to accept commercial primers, From there you'll go to your standard case prep. I've included photos of tool/equipment options commonly available. Photos coming soon




Using the K31 Threading Kit for Threaded Dampers and Brakes


Remove the barreled action from the stock. Clamp the barrel in an upright orhorizontal position in a sturdy padded vise. Hardwood, aluminum or brass, or heavy leather all make suitable vise jaw pads.
Do not attempt to hold the barrel in your hands while threading.

Next insert the small end of the brass guide rod into the muzzle. Assemble the two handles into the threading head and apply thread cutting oil to the inside of the die and the muzzle of the rifle. DO NOT USE LUBRICATING OIL for this purpose as it will inhibit the cutting action and cause the threads to tear. Slide the die body onto the brass rod and seat it against the muzzle. Applying pressure, begin to rotate the die in a clockwise direction. You must use plentyof oil while doing this, and it is necessary to back the die off one-quarter turn for every revolution of the die to break the chip. Do not allow the chips to buildup inside the die as this also will tear the thread. An air gun to blow out the chips is a good idea. When the face of the die contacts the front sight band, blow out all the chips one last time then back off the die. If you have been careful to follow all of the above instructions, you should have a clean serviceable thread. Sometimes short sections of thread will tear in spite of all your efforts. Unless these are severe, it will not affect the strength of the thread. If you do not feel confident in your ability to do this job please take it to a gunsmith or skilled metalworker familiar with this kind of work. SWISS PRODUCTS ASSUMES NO LIABILITY FOR THE IMPROPER USE OF THIS TOOL




Scope Rings


There are a lot of manufacturers of 1 inch and 30mm rings with a 3/8 inch clamps. Most are intended for 22 rimfire caliber rifles, but I've had the set on my rifle since 1979 without ever a failure. Just make sure your front ring is up against the stop on the rail and you will be just fine.
If you have any questions, don't hesitate to call on the Swiss product helpline at 406-858-2066. We are always here to help you.
Look at the images below. They're of a k31 but it applies to the G11 rif;le series exactly the same......... Just on the opposite side.
All of this information applies to both the K 31 and the G 11 series rifles. On our opening page go to the upper right hand corner and click on the " rifle info" section and you will see the correct way to sight in or zero and offset scope mount.
Remember, you should be zeroing the center of your scope to the rail itself before mounting it on the rifle. If you're not sure about this call me on the helpline and I will explain.. https://www.grafs.com/retail/catalog/category/categoryId/3462?fbclid=IwAR1RtunpkyBgE7M-IvfylxtmJvIyXIErcWcjD7MW18fiLp7SRs_L0e8dgkI https://www.amazon.com/Sniper-Ring-3-Dovetail-Medium-Profile/dp/B013VU97WM https://www.google.com/search?q=1+inch+scope+rings+3%2F8+dovetail&rlz=1C1CHBF_enUS805US805&oq=1%3E+scope+rings+with+3%2F8%22+&aqs=chrome.2.69i57j0l2.22318j0j15&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8 https://www.amazon.com/NcSTAR-RB25-NcStar-Ring-3-Dovetail-Medium/dp/B001C20028 https://www.opticsplanet.com/s/dovetail-rings https://www.amazon.com/Aim-Sports-Scope-Rings-Dovetail-low/dp/B006IWOSHK https://www.pyramydair.com/a/Accessories/Mounts_bases_rings_levels_and_scope_stops/2_piece_mounts/59 In our experience, it's not usual for brass to hit your scope upon ejection, but if brass is touching your scope, then go to the hardware store and buy a small roll of the product 3M VHB. Make sure it's in black and about 1/2 inch wide. It's a double sided adhesive that's about 1/64 inch thick so it does provide a cushion. Wipe the lower quadrant closest to the receiver with alcohol, let it dry and then wipe again with a soft, clean cloth. Cut off two or 3 inches of the tape and apply it right to that area where you think the brass is touching. Rub a small amount of any kind of oil onto the surface of the tape and that will contaminate and deactivate the adhesive on the exposed side.
That will be the end of your problems.




Op-Rod information


These two points on the lug, A&B are not inherently weak, but are the common place for the Op-Rod to fail if its going to with repeated undue harsh use. Keep in mind the age of these rifles.

(Photo coming soon)

We typically weld the LHO bridge to original Op-Rods, so we have intimate knowledge of the steel and its limits.
(Thanks Guisan)


We have Swiss Rifles here in the armoury, and I mean we have a lot of them, all kinds. When in correct mechanical condition not one of them requires undue force to cycle. Extraction is crisp and smooth, and running a correctly profiled cartridge into battery is smooth, effortless and a few at most requiring a solid push for the last 1/16" of bolt travel.

If your bolt is clean and your cartridges properly sized, seat depth correct for the rifle you'll have no problem running a cartridge smoothly into battery. If you have to slap them in or out, you have a problem and one most likely easily solved.

Rapping on the bolt handle with anything at all to remove a stuck case is a sure way to stress that op-rod and lug. Never, ever use a mallet or anything else on a k31 bolt handle.
So how do you remove a stuck case in a Swiss Rifle?

Try this:
You need to apply strong rearward inertia to the entire bolt, not just the handle.

Take the rifle in your left hand, holding it by the mid-foregrip. Place the edge your right hand (like a karate chop) against the bolt handle or you can grip it firmly with your fingers (not quite as effective with that type of bolt), or you can use a small block of wood in your hand to put downward pressure on the bolthandle. Raise the rifle about 18" off the ground and bring it down quickly, rapping the buttstock sharply against the ground while putting hard downpressure against the bolt with your right hand. Do it more than once if you need to, but I can tell you that its worked very time for me for as long as I've been reloading no matter what the rifle. If its a turn bolt action, rotate the bolt handle up and do the procedure. The AR10 is done the same way but just grip the bolt handle like you're extracting a cartridge and pull down hard while striking the butt on the ground.
Don't do this on concrete for obvious reasons.













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